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  1. #61
    Administrator sunny47's Avatar
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    Goodson Trial Enters Fifth Day
    June 15, 2016

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    4:19 p.m.

    The state has rested its case.


    3:39 p.m.

    Retired Maryland State Police Maj. Neill Franklin took the stand. He testified that officers have very limited discretion in acting against general orders on seatbelts or medical attention.

    Franklin said, based on cell phone video taken at the scene, Freddie Gray posed very little danger to officers as he was loaded into the police van.

    He said shackling a suspect's legs while they are not belted in prevents the passenger from stabilizing during a so-called "rough ride." He said that assuming Gray was calm, the van driver should have seen to it he was properly restrained, and was obliged to get Gray to a hospital if Gray asked. Franklin said he should have asked dispatch to send another van to pick up Donta Allen, and the stop was another opportunity to buckle Gray in.

    On cross-examination, Franklin clarified that that discretion is "extremely limited." He was asked if the fact Gray needed to be carried to the van was a sign of unwillingness, and Franklin said it was noncompliance. However, he said that kicking in the van isn't necessarily a sign of unwillingness--it could be done to get officers' attention.




    12:30 p.m.

    Prosecutors are now presenting their 22nd witness over five days at the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police van driver charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    When court resumes after the lunch break, testimony will begin from Retired Maryland State Police Major Neill Franklin, who the prosecution is offering as an expert witness on police training.

    Franklin also testified for the state at last month's trial of Officer Edward Nero.

    He is currently the executive director of Law Enforcement Officers Against Prohibition, which seeks to legalize marijuana and revise drug laws.

    Defense attorneys objected to admitting Franklin's testimony,after Franklin told them he had not been on patrol since 2010, and he was never involved in transporting inmates using a wagon similar to the one driven by Goodson.

    Judge Barry Williams allowed Franklin's testimony.

    The prosecutions first witness of the day, and 21st overall was Angelique Herbert, the Baltimore City EMT/Paramedic who responded to the Western District police station to treat Gray.

    Herbert told prosecutors that when she first arrived on the scene she asked the awaiting officers, including Godson "what the f*** did you guys do?"

    Herbert testified that she tried to revive Gray, who was not breathing, and who had lost all bowel function.

    Herbert described one of the officers at the scene as a "light skinned officer." When asked to identify that officer, she pointed to Goodson.

    Herbert also told prosecutors that Gray;s neck, "felt like a crumbly bag of rocks."

    Herbert also testified that based on his symptoms, it is possible Freddie Gray may have ingested some type of drug.

    Under cross-examination from defense attorney Amy Askew, Herbert testified that Goodson, was among the officers who helped her take Gray out of the van and load her onto a gurney and then into an ambulance.

    Herbert was on the stand for about an hour.

    Franklin's testimony will begin when court resumes at 2 p.m.


    11:20 a.m.

    A 30 minute bench conference delayed the start of testimony this morning at the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police Officer Caesar Goodson, the van driver charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    Following the conference with lawyers, Judge Barry Williams said in open court the discussion centered on evidence the prosecution was ordered to turn over to the defense earlier this week, and the defense concerns about it.

    One piece of evidence concerns a detective's conversation with Assistant Medical Examiner Dr. Carol Allan, in which she discussed the possibility that Gray's manner of death was accidental.

    Allan concluded in her autopsy that Gray's manner of death was homicide, and last week she testified that the words accidental "never crossed my lips," except when she told her boss that manner of death was being ruled out.

    The evidence includes the detectives notes of the conversation, and the judge says the defense can raise the issue with the detective, if she is called to testify for the defense.

    As to the original issue which led to the judge ordering the prosecution to hand over evidence, the May, 2015 meeting with Donata Allen.

    He was the second man who was loaded into a separate section of the van with Gray.

    The judge concluded since no notes were taken, there is no evidence related to that to be turned over.

    However, prosecutors did hand over the notes of two police detectives who went o Allen's residence in Gilmor Homes, seeking an interview with Allen.

    Prosecutors say the family told detectives that Allen had retained a lawyer, and to contact the lawyer.

    The prosecution also handed over enhanced audio of the scene around the second police van stop at Mount and Baker Street, where officers took Gray out of the van, placed him in leg shackles and plastic cuffs and then loaded him back into the van.

    Both sides concluded that the audio does not make it clear if Gray could be heard saying anything during this stop.

    The defense is expected to raise that issue in its case.

    With the evidence issues address, the state was allowed to continue its case.

    Prosecutors presented its 21st witness, Angelique Herbert one of the EMT/paramedics who treated Gray at the police station.

    During the bench conference, a man was removed form the courtroom by sheriff's deputies after he handed State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby a note, as she was sitting in the courtroom, watching the bench conference.



    10:05 a.m.

    A man has been removed from the courtroom by Baltimore City Sheriff's deputies as the fifth day of Officer Caesar Goodson's trial was about to begin.

    The incident took place as Judge Barry Williams was conferring with lawyers at the bench.

    Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby was sitting in the front row of the courtroom behind the prosecution table, when an African American man walked up to Mosby and handed her a note.

    He was taken out of the courtroom by deputies.

    Under courthouse rules, spectators must be seated at all times when in the courtroom, and there is no talking while the judge is on the bench.

    The man was being questioned by deputies in the courthosue hallwy.


    7:10 a.m.

    It is day five of the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police van driver Caesar Goodson, charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    The state has not rested its case, but the defense has presented its first witnesses.

    In court papers filed last year, prosecutors said they would take five days to present their case.

    That schedule was interrupted Tuesday afternoon, when both sides agreed to let the defense present two expert witnesses.

    Both testified that Freddie Gray’s fatal injuries occurred later than prosecutors allege.

    Both said they occurred right before the van arrived at the final stop, the Western District Police Station.

    Former Washington DC Medical examiner Jonathan Arden also concluded the manner of Gray’s death was accidental, not a homicide as the autopsy report concluded.

    Under cross examination, Arden testified he never examined Gray’s body, and so he did not have direct knowledge of his injuries.

    The prosecution has presented 20 witnesses over four days.

    Prosecutors are expected to present more witnesses today related to the alleged "rough ride" that they say caused Gray's injuries.

    Once the state rests, the defense is expected to ask for the charges to be dismissed, and they could argue for motions related to the evidence prosecutors turned over to them on Monday night, by order of Judge Barry Williams.

    So far none of those motions have been filed.

    Court resumes this morning at 9:30 a.m.
    Last edited by sunny47; 06-15-2016 at 10:06 PM. Reason: ETA link to article

  2. #62
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    Goodson Trial Enters Fifth Day; Judge Again Rules State Violated Discovery Rules

    Wednesday, June 15, 2016
    Robert Lang, WBAL NewsRadio 1090

    12:30 p.m.

    Prosecutors are now presenting their 22nd witness over five days at the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police van driver charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    When court resumes after the lunch break, testimony will begin from Retired Maryland State Police Major Neill Franklin, who the prosecution is offering as an expert witness on police training.

    Franklin also testified for the state at last month's trial of Officer Edward Nero.

    He is currently the executive director of Law Enforcement Officers Against Prohibition, which seeks to legalize marijuana and revise drug laws.
    Defense attorneys objected to admitting Franklin's testimony,after Franklin told them he had not been on patrol since 2010, and he was never involved in transporting inmates using a wagon similar to the one driven by Goodson.

    Judge Barry Williams allowed Franklin's testimony.

    The prosecutions first witness of the day, and 21st overall was Angelique Herbert, the Baltimore City EMT/Paramedic who responded to the Western District police station to treat Gray.

    Herbert told prosecutors that when she first arrived on the scene she asked the awaiting officers, including Godson "what the f*** did you guys do?"

    Herbert testified that she tried to revive Gray, who was not breathing, and who had lost all bowel function.

    Herbert described one of the officers at the scene as a "light skinned officer." When asked to identify that officer, she pointed to Goodson.

    Herbert also told prosecutors that Gray;s neck, "felt like a crumbly bag of rocks."

    Herbert also testified that based on his symptoms, it is possible Freddie Gray may have ingested some type of drug.

    Under cross-examination from defense attorney Amy Askew, Herbert testified that Goodson, was among the officers who helped her take Gray out of the van and load her onto a gurney and then into an ambulance.

    Herbert was on the stand for about an hour.

    Franklin's testimony will begin when court resumes at 2 p.m.

    11:55 a.m.

    A 30 minute bench conference delayed the start of testimony this morning at the second degree murder trial of Baltimore police Officer Caesar Goodson, the van driver charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    Following the conference with lawyers, Judge Barry Williams said in open court the discussion centered on evidence the prosecution was ordered to turn over to the defense earlier this week, and the defense concerns about it.

    Judge Williams again ruled that the state violated discovery rules by withholding evidence from the defense that would have exonerated Goodson.
    The judge is allowing the case to continue, but he did address the issue in open court.

    One piece of evidence turned over Monday concerns a detective's conversation with Assistant Medical Examiner Dr. Carol Allan. In that conversation, Allan discussed the possibility that Gray's manner of death was accidental.

    Allan concluded in her autopsy that Gray's manner of death was homicide, and last week she testified that the words accidental "never crossed my lips," except when she told her boss that manner of death was being ruled out.

    The evidence includes the detective's notes of the conversation, and the judge says the defense can raise the issue with the detective, if she is called to testify for the defense.

    Prosecutor Michael Schatzow had argued these notes were similar to a conversation Officer Caesar Goodson had with an internal affairs detective in which the judge denied prosecutors from admitting into evidence.

    Judge Williams says this evidence is different, since Porter's comments were not recorded either on audio, or by written notes, but written notes exist of the other detective's conversation with Dr. Allan.

    As to the original issue which led to the judge ordering the prosecution to hand over evidence, the May 2015 meeting with Donta Allen. He was the second man who was loaded into a separate section of the van with Gray.

    The judge concluded since no notes were taken, there is no evidence related to that to be turned over.

    However, prosecutors did hand over the notes of two police detectives who went to Allen's residence in Gilmor Homes, seeking an interview with Allen.
    Prosecutors say the family told detectives that Allen had retained a lawyer, and to contact the lawyer.

    The prosecution also handed over enhanced audio of the scene around the second police van stop at Mount and Baker Street, where officers took Gray out of the van, placed him in leg shackles and plastic cuffs and then loaded him back into the van.

    Both sides concluded that the audio does not make it clear if Gray could be heard saying anything during this stop.

    The defense is expected to raise that issue in its case.

    With the evidence issues address, the state was allowed to continue its case.

    Prosecutors presented its 21st witness, Angelique Herbert, one of the EMT/paramedics who treated Gray at the police station.

    During the bench conference, a man was removed form the courtroom by sheriff's deputies after he handed State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby a note, as she was sitting in the courtroom, watching the bench conference.

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    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

  3. #63
    Administrator Aubrey's Avatar
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    As Goodson Trial Nears End Of Fifth Day, State Rests Case


    Wednesday, June 15, 2016
    Robert Lang, WBAL NewsRadio 1090

    6:10 p.m.

    The prosecution rested its case at around 4:15 this afternoon after presenting 22 witnesses over the last five days.

    The defense has already filed a written motion asking the judge for an acquittal on all charges.

    That is a fairly standard practice at the mid-point of any trial.

    Judge Barry Williams has given the prosecution the option of filing their own written response, and the motion will be considered in court when the trial resumes tomorrow morning at 9:30.

    The judge also indicated that with the prosecution recessing now, the defense has said they will " truncate their case," meaning the defense case could go much shorter than planned.

    It also raises question whether the defense will call Donta Allen, the second prisoner loaded into the van with Freddie Gray.

    Defense attorney Andrew Graham noted in his opening statement last week that the defense would call Allen to refute the state's argument that Gray was a victim of a "rough ride."

    It is not clear whether Goodson will take the stand in his own defense.

    The last witness to testify for the state, was retired Maryland State Police Major Neill Franklin, who helped write training standard for the Baltimore City Police.

    Under cross examination Franklin admitted he did not know what a 10-15 was. That is police radio code for request of a transport van.

    Prosecutors maintain that Goodson's van was requested after the fourth van stop to go to Pennsylvania and North Avenues to pick up Donta Allen.

    Under re-direct, Franklin read from the radio transcripts that the 10-15 code was never mentioned in the radio calls.

    Also under cross examination, Franklin elaborated on the definition of a "rough ride."

    Franklin defined a "rough ride," as a "sudden, stop, sudden turn and a slight deceleration."

    After court ended for the day, one of the elevators broke down in Courthouse East.

    It is not clear if Goodson or his lawyers were stuck in the elevator, but the fire department was called.

    Goodson was seen leaving the front door of the courthouse surrounded by sheriff's deputies at around 4:50 p.m.

    Previously he has left the courthouse through a side entrance.

    Goodson met his lawyers on Lexington Street, got into their car, and then drove away.


    4:19 p.m.

    The state has rested its case.

    3:39 p.m.

    Retired Maryland State Police Maj. Neill Franklin took the stand. He testified that officers have very limited discretion in acting against general orders on seatbelts or medical attention.

    Franklin said, based on cell phone video taken at the scene, Freddie Gray posed very little danger to officers as he was loaded into the police van.

    He said shackling a suspect's legs while they are not belted in prevents the passenger from stabilizing during a so-called "rough ride." He said that assuming Gray was calm, the van driver should have seen to it he was properly restrained, and was obliged to get Gray to a hospital if Gray asked. Franklin said he should have asked dispatch to send another van to pick up Donta Allen, and the stop was another opportunity to buckle Gray in.

    On cross-examination, Franklin clarified that that discretion is "extremely limited." He was asked if the fact Gray needed to be carried to the van was a sign of unwillingness, and Franklin said it was noncompliance. However, he said that kicking in the van isn't necessarily a sign of unwillingness--it could be done to get officers' attention.

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    Last edited by sunny47; 06-15-2016 at 11:26 PM.
    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

  4. #64
    Administrator Aubrey's Avatar
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    Goodson Trial Day Six: Defense To Resume Case

    Thursday, June 16, 2016
    Robert Lang, WBAL NewsRadio 1090

    4:10 p.m.

    As thought, the defense called Donta Allen to the stand. Allen was in the same police transport van as Freddie Gray, though he was separated from Gray by a partition down the middle of the vehicle.

    Allen, himself in the custody on Pennsylvania charges, was taken to Baltimore to testify in the case. On the stand, Allen at first said he did not recall being placed in the van with Gray. Showed a record of the arrest, Allen still claimed not to remember.

    "I don't remember anything," Allen said. "How can this document help me remember?"

    He answered defense attorneys' questions several times in similar fashion.

    Court is now in recess. It's unclear if Allen will take the stand when the trial resumes.

    3:40 p.m.

    Defense attorneys announced in court today at the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson that their next witness will be Donta Allen.

    Allen was loaded into a separate section of the police transport van with Freddie Gray, when the van stopped at Pennsylvania and North Avenues.

    He has offered conflicting accounts into whether he heard Gray screaming, or whether the ride in the van was bumpy.

    Allen is incarcerated for a probation violation, and Judge Barry Williams say court will resume once Allen is brought into the courtroom.

    3:05 p.m.

    Court resumed at around 2:15 after the lunch break at the second degree murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, the police van driver charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    The fourth defense witness of the day and sixth overall was retired Providence, Rhode Island, police detective John Ryan, who consults police departments on training.

    He testified as an expert witness.

    Ryan says seat belt policy gives officers discretion.

    Ryan said Officer Goodson's and Officer William Porter's actions not seat belting Gray because he resisted as he was loaded into van.

    Ryan says even though Gray was described as "docile" at fourth stop, it was reasonable for officers not to seat belt Gray.

    Ryan says detainees go "from docile to hostile to docile" to try to trick officers, and try to attack officers."

    Prosecutors have argued that Goodson's failure to put Gray in a seat belt amounts to reckless endangerment, and contributed to Gray;'s injuries and death.

    Prosecutors also say on five separate occasions Goodson could have put Gray into a seat belt and get him medical attention, and that "depraved indifference" contributed to his death.

    The most serious charge against Goodson is second degree murder, depraved heart.



    12:36 p.m.

    The defense has now presented a total of three witnesses today, and five overall at the seocnd degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police Officer Caesar Goodson.

    Following a court break before noon, prosecutors said they had finished cross examining Baltimore City Police Det. Dawnyell Taylor, who was the lead detective on the death of Gray.

    After a cross-examination in which prosecutor Michael Schatzow asked if he asked for Taylor to be removed because of conflicts with fellow prosecutor Janice Beldsoe, Taylor was asked by defense attorney Andrew Graham if she was telling the truth.

    "Yes," Taylor replied. With no further questions Taylor left the witness stand.

    The next defense witness was Baltimore City Police transport van driver Mark Butler, who has driven the same van Goodson was driving on the day he transported Gray.

    Butler said he rode with Goodson in as transport van, "hundreds of times."

    However, Butler was barred from describing how well Goodson drove the van, because of objections from prosecutors.

    Butler testified he was aware of the policy requiring prisoners in vans to be placed in seat belts, but he said he was never trained on the policy.

    He described the seat belt as a standard lap belt, with a button that prisoners could use to release the belt.

    Prosecutors declined to cross examine Butler, and he left the stand.

    Judge Barry Williams then recessed court for lunch, with the proceedings scheduled to resume at 2 p.m.


    12:00 p.m,

    The defense is on its second witness of the day, and this witness is describing a sharp conflict between the lead Baltimore City Police Detective and Assistant State’s Attorney Janice Bledsoe.

    The witness is Detective Dawnyell Taylor, who took over as lead detective in August, after the original lead detective went on medical leave.

    Under questioning from defense attorney Andrew Graham, she detailed an April conversation with Dr. Carroll Allan the medical examiner, who conducted Gray's autopsy.

    During the meetings on April 23 and April 29 of last year, Taylor says Allan repeatedly described the manner of Freddie Gray’s death as “a freakish accident that no human hands could cause”

    This conflicts with Allan’s own testimony in which she said the manner of death was homicide.

    Prosecutor Michael Schatzow, on cross examination, asked Taylor if he had asked to remove Taylor as lead detective because he had accused Taylor of "sabotaging the prosecution’s case."

    Taylor replied Schatzow didn’t have the authority to do that.

    Taylor said she remains the lead detective, but her bosses told her not to speak to state’s attorney’s office.

    Taylor described an August , 2015, meeting with Janice Bledsoe in which she presented the findings of the Taylor meeting where Bledsoe took some of her notes and stormed out of the room.

    Taylor was asked whether she questioned Bledsoe’s integrity has a prosecutor, and Taylor responded that Bledsoe questioned her integrity as a detective.

    That led to a bench conference, where Bledsoe was seen gesturing to the judge and Schatzow.

    Judge Barry Williams then called a 10 minute recess.

    Earlier, Baltimore City Police Det. Cory Alston testified for the defense.

    He was another detective who met with Allan, along with Taylor, and said Allan gave a similar description of of the manner of Gray's death.

    Alston said he did not take notes of the meeting.

    These are the third and fourth witnesses for the defense.

    The defense was allowed to present two expert witnesses earlier in the week, before prosecutors rested their case.


    10:37 a.m.

    Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams has denied a defense request to drop the seven charges against Baltimore City Police van driver Caesar Goodson, who is charged with the death of Freddie Gray.

    The decision means the trial will move forward and the defense will begin presenting the bulk of its case today.

    The judge's decision came after a 35 minute hearing this morning.


    Judge Williams said on the most serious charge against Goodson, second degree murder, depraved heart, it was a "close call."

    During the hearing the judge questioned both attorneys as whether there was enough evidence to warrant the charge.

    The judge determined at this stage in the trial, which requires him to view evidence in the light most favorable to the state, there is enough evidence to move forward.

    Goodson is also charged with manslaughter; second degree assault; manslaughter by auto or boat; criminally negligent manslaughter by vehicle; misconduct in office; and reckless endangerment.


    During the hearing, the judge asked prosecutors what evidence to they have of a "rough ride" that prosecutors believe caused Gray's injuries.

    Prosecutor Michael Schatzow points to the video shown in court, which shows Goodson's van not stopping at the intersection of North Freemont and Mosher Street, and making a wide turn, before stopping after the intersection.

    Schatzow said that "rough ride" is not the basis for any indictment, but does show where Gray's injuries occurred.

    Judge Williams pointed out the "rough ride" video shown in court did not meet the definition provided by prosecution witness Neill Franklin.

    Franklin said a rough ride is defined by a sudden stop, followed by a wide turn, followed by a sudden deceleration.

    The defense has begun to present witnesses.

    Defense attorneys were allowed to present two expert witnesses, ealreir this week, before the state finished its case.



    7:35 a.m.

    The state has rested, and now it’s the defense’s turn at the second degree murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    The defense has already presented two expert witnesses who disputed the findings of the autopsy report on Freddie Gray, that the manner of death was homicide.

    This morning, before the defense presents any more witnesses, Judge Barry Williams will consider a motion by the defense to acquit Goodson on all charges, noting the state hasn’t proven its case.

    That is standard procedure at criminal trials.

    On Wednesday, offering a hint into how he’ll rule on that motion, Judge Williams said the defense promises a " truncated case," meaning the case will likely be short.
    There is the possibility the defense could rest its case later today, or tomorrow.

    In his opening statement last week, defense attorney Andrew Graham told the court that the defense would call Allen, the second man loaded into a separate section of the police transport van that carried Freddie Gray.

    Allen, who is serving prison time for violating probation, had offered conflicting statement over whether the ride in the van was bumpy or smooth, and whether he heard Gray kicking and screaming in the van.

    It is not clear if Allen will be called in a short defense case.

    It is also possible the defense may call Officer William Porter to the stand again.

    On Monday, Porter testified for the prosecution, with limited immunity, and under cross examination said he received no acknowledgement that Goodson agreed with his recommendation that Gray be taken to the hospital after the van's fourth stop, at Druid Hill and Dolphin Avenues., even though he told prosecutors Goodson said "sure" when he offered that recommendation.

    At the start of his testimony, Porter said that he met with Goodson's defense team twice to discuss his testimony.

    The defense also has the option of including the notes of a Baltimore City Police detective, who interviewed Assistant Medical Examiner Dr. Carroll Allan, who performed the autopsy on Gray.

    In those notes, Allan indicates she was considering ruling the manner of Gray;'s death as accidental.

    That directly conflicts with her testimony last week, in which Allan said the phrase accidental, "never crossed my lips," except when she told her boss that the option was being ruled out in Gray's case.

    Allan testified that she ruled the manner of Gray;s death was homicide.

    Those notes were one of the pieces of evidence the state was forced to turn over to the defense this week, under orders from Judge Williams.

    The judge had said prosecutors violated rules of discovery that requires prosecutors to turn over evidence to the defense. However, the judge is allowing the trial to continue.

    Court resumes at 9:30 this morning.

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    Last edited by Aubrey; 06-16-2016 at 10:12 PM.
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    Freddie Gray case: Judge denies motion to acquit Baltimore officer Caesar Goodson Jr.

    June 16, 2016

    Judge Barry G. Williams has denied a motion to acquit Baltimore Police Officer Caesar Goodson Jr., charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    Defense attorneys for Goodson filed the written motion at the conclusion of the state’s case asking Williams to issue a judgment of acquittal, based on the defense claim that prosecutors had not proven Goodson’s guilt to a reasonable degree on the charges against him – including second-degree depraved heart murder.

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    Donta Allen Testifies, Claims Forgetfulness In Sixth Day Of Goodson Trial
    Thursday, June 16, 2016

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    6:54 p.m.

    There was plenty of conflict on the sixth day of the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police Officer Caesar Goodson, the police van driver who is charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    The day started with Judge Barry Williams denying a defense motion to dismiss the case.

    Williams said at this point, the state had presented enough evidence to continue the case on all seven charges, though the judge said it was, "a close call" on the most serious charge, seocnd degree murder depraved heart.

    Following that decision, the defense called five witnesses today.

    The witnesses included the lead Baltimore City Police detective investigating Gray's death, Dawnyell Taylor.

    She told defense attorneys about her two interviews in April of last year with Dr. Carol Allan, the assistant medical examiner who performed Freddie Gray’s autopsy.

    Taylor provided notes from the interview in which Allan told police Gray’s manner of death was a, "freakish accident. that no human hands could cause."

    That contradicts Allan’s testimony last week describing the manner of death as a homicide.

    Under cross examination, Taylor was asked by Assistant State's Attorney Michael Schatzow, if prosecutors asked she be removed from the case because "she sabotaged the prosecutor’s case," and had conflicts with prosecutor Janice Bledsoe.

    Taylor told Schatzow, "you don;t have that power," and added she remains lead detective.

    Taylor said Bledsoe stormed out of a meeting with her last August, and questioned her integrity.

    Later in the day, Donta Allen the second man loaded into the van was called for the defense.

    In a session that at times turned standoffish, Allen told defense attorneys he couldn’t recall that day.

    Later video of Allen’s statement to police was shown in which he said he heard Gray banging his head, and Allen confirmed that on the stand.

    So far, the defense has presented seven witnesses this week.

    More defense testimony is expected on Friday, when court resumes at 9:30.

    The state could wrap up its case on Friday.



    5:45 p.m.

    Donta Allen told defense attorney Matt Fraling in redirect he was in fact under the influence of Xanax and heroin when he gave his statement to police, and lied at the time about his substance use.

    Fraling asked Allen to read some of that statement to police. He read potrions where he told police about the banging he heard from the other side of the van. At one point, Allen asked why he was being told to read it aloud.

    "Because I said so," Fraling said, to prosecutors' objection.

    Judge Barry Williams then admonished Fraling to ask another question, and it was after that that Allen made the admission about his drug use on the day he spoke with police.

    Once Allen finished his testimony, we was led out of the courtroom by state corrections officers.

    Judge Barry Williams then recessed proceedings for the day at around 5:30 p.m.

    5:10 p.m.

    Donta Allen returned to the stand as video of his initial interview with police was played in court.

    In that video, he is shown telling police he heard banging from the other side of a partition in the van, but did not say from which part of the van that banging was coming. Asked by defense attorney Matt Fraling on the stand, Allen said he did not recall that conversation.

    On cross-examination from prosecutor Janice Bledsoe, Allen was more forthcoming. He said he remembered hearing officers on the other side of the partition calling Freddie Gray's name. He said he remembered speaking to a white officer and clarified that the banging on the wall of the van sounded like Gray banging his head, but that he could not tell for sure.

    Allen's testimony came with some controversy. Notes from prosecutors' meeting with Allen were not turned over to defense. Prosecutors said nothing of substance came from that meeting, but Judge Barry Williams ordered those notes handed over just the same, and admonished the prosecution for disregarding the rules of evidence.

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    Freddie Gray case: Defense continues in murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson
    June 17, 2016

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    Defense attorneys will continue calling witnesses Friday in the seventh day of the second-degree murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson Jr., the driver of the van in which Gray suffered fatal spinal injuries last year.

    It is unclear how many more witnesses the defense intends to call.


    In court Thursday, tensions between police and prosecutors erupted, with a top prosecutor accusing a lead detective of trying to sabotage the state's case against six officers charged in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray.

    Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow also suggested that top police officials tried to persuade the doctor who performed Gray's autopsy to rule his death an accident rather than a homicide.
    Detective Dawnyell Taylor, lead detective in the police investigation of Gray's death, denied the claims and in turn suggested that Deputy State's Attorney Janice Bledsoe lacked integrity and was dismissive of evidence in the case.

    The clashes came during a sixth day of testimony that day began with Circuit Judge Barry G. Williams denying a defense motion to dismiss the charges following the conclusion of the prosecution's case Wednesday, but only after expressing "concern" about the merits of the murder charge.

    Goodson, 46, is the third officer to stand trial. The first trial, of Officer William Porter, ended in a hung jury and mistrial in December. He is scheduled to be retried in September. Last month, Officer Edward Nero was acquitted of all charges by Williams after a bench trial.

  8. #68
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    Goodson Trial Day Seven: Defense Could Wrap Up Today
    Friday, June 17, 2016

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    11:12 a.m.

    The defense has rested at the second degree murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson.

    Goodson chose not to take the stand. Prosecutors chose not to present rebuttal witnesses, so Judge Barry Williams recessed proceedings until 10 a.m. Monday, when closing arguments will be presented.


    The defense presented nine witnesses over three days, though the judge ordered the testimony of the eighth witness stricken from the record at the request of prosecutors.

    Prosecutors presented 22 witnesses over five days ending on Wednesday.




    11:07 a.m.

    Officer Edward Nero, who was acquitted at his own trial last month related to the death of Freddie Gray, testified for the defense Friday/

    Nero was on the stand for only 15 minutes. Nero, at his own trial, testified that he helped load Freddie Gray back into the van at its second stop, after police officers put leg shackles and flex cuffs on Gray.

    That stop was at Mount and Baker Streets, and police moved the van to this stop, to get away from a growing crowd that was forming at the site of Gray's arrest in the 1700 block of Presbury Street.

    Nero described Gray at the second stop as "uncooperative" and "passive aggressive."

    Nero also told defense attorney Matt Fraling that once the van door was closed, he could not see Gray kicking, but he did see the van shaking and heard banging. The defense has argued that Gray was violent and that is the reason Goodson did not put him in a seat belt. Under cross examination, Nero told prosecutor Michael Schatzow that Gray was going limp.

    He also told the prosecutor that he could not remember if Goodson closed the van door, though he remembers the door was closed.








    10:48 a.m.

    Officer Edward Nero, who was acquitted last month at his trial related to Freddie Gray's death, was spotted in a hallway at Courthouse East.

    He is expected to take the stand relative to a defense motion at the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson.




    10:32 a.m.

    Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams has stricken the testimony of one of the defense witnesses at the second degree murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, the polcie van driver charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    Judge Williams agreed with prosecutors on a request to strike the testimony of Baltimore City Police Detective Patty Bauer, who is a member of the police departments CRASH team which investigates department related accidents, and is a part-time instructor at the police academy.

    Bauer admitted that she created a 2013 curriculum for officers in performing accident investigations

    Bauer was asked repeatedly if she had taught the course on September 8, 2013.

    Bauer said while she wrote the lesson plan, she could not recall teaching the course on September 8, 2013, when prosecutors say Officer Goodson took the class.

    Judge Williams said in his ruling that "it was not difficult to remember who taught the course," so he ordered the testimony stricken from the record.

    Earlier, Bauer told defense attorney Amy Askew that seat belt use was taught in the course, but there was no part of the course that addressed putting prisoners in seat belts in police transport wagons.

    Under cross examination, prosecutor Janice Bledsoe repeatedly asked her if it was policy to put all passengers in seat belts. The defense objected, and the judge sustained the objection preventing Bauer from answering.

    Bledsoe asked Bauer if she remembered teaching Goodson.

    Bauer said she did not know.

    Bledsoe asked if Bauer recalled a meeting with the prosecutors where she looked at her calendar to check and see if she taught the course. Bauer said she did not have the specific course date in her calendar.

    It was at that point that Bledsoe, who at times raised her voice in the questioning, requested that Bauer's testimony e stricken.

    Judge Williams made his ruling after a brief bench conference with lawyers


    9:05 a.m.

    Officer Caesar Goodson has arrived at Courthouse East for the seventh day of his second degree murder trial.

    Goodson walked into court this morning at around 8:45 accompanied by sheriff's deputies and Sean Malone, the Annapolis lobbyist and senior partner in the law firm that employs defense attorney Matthew Fraling

    Malone was in court for much of the day Thursday watching the proceedings.

    Court is scheduled to begin at 9:30.


    7:15 a.m.

    It is day seven of the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police van driver Caesar Goodson, charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

    Having presented both a detective who found contradictory statements form the medical examiner, and the man who rode in the van with Freddie Gray, it is not clear how many more witnesses the defense will present.

    Because of Judge Barry Williams gag order on attorneys, it is not knwon if Officer Goodson will take the stand in his own defense.

    Earlier this week, the judge announced the defense would present a "truncated case," and court sessions have run late this week.

    Those are signs the defense will wrap up today, with closing arguments and the judge’s verdict next week.

    Defense attorneys have presented seven witnesses so far.

    The prosecution rested on Wednesday having presented 22 witnesses.
    Last edited by sunny47; 06-17-2016 at 05:51 PM.

  9. #69
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    Goodson Trial Day Seven: Defense Rests, Closing Arguments Monday

    Friday, June 17, 2016 - Robert Lang, WBAL NewsRadio 1090

    12: 35 p.m.

    The defense has rested at the second degree murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson.

    Goodson chose not to take the stand, and the state rested its case at 11:10 a.m.

    Prosecutors chose not to present rebuttal witnesses, so Judge Barry Williams recessed proceedings until 10 a.m. Monday, when closing arguments will be presented.

    The defense presented nine witnesses over three days, though the judge ordered the testimony of the eighth witness stricken from the record at the request of prosecutors.

    Prosecutors presented 22 witnesses over five days ending on Wednesday.

    Criminal defense attorney Warren Brown provided analysis of the trial in an interview with WBAL's Robert Lang and Chris Gordon of NBC 4 in Washington.

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]


    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

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    Notes From Goodson Trial
    Sunday, June 19, 2016

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    After standing outside of Courthouse East for more than a week holding a sign reading "Justice for Freddie Gray," Arthur Johnson of East Baltimore went inside the courtroom Friday and watched as another accused officer Edward Nero testified that Freddie Gray was "passive aggressive" and "uncooperative" as he was loading Gray back into Goodson’s van.

    Johnson told Maryland's News This Week that he fears Goodson will be acquitted.

    On most days of this trial, Johnson has been the only protester outside of Courthouse East.

    Johnson says he expects more protesters to be at the courthouse when Judge Barry Williams hands down his verdict.

    Closing arguments are set for Monday, with a verdict some time this week.

    Defense attorney Warren Brown who is also one of the court spectators told Maryland's News This Week that the defense has cast doubt on the prosecution’s theory that Freddie Gray;’s injuries occurred in a rough ride driven by Goodson.

    Before he hears closing arguments Monday, Judge Barry Williams will have to decide on a defense motion to admit part of Prosecutor Michael Schatzow comments during the closing arguments of Nero’s trial.

    At the time, Schatzow told the judge that Nero and other officers had legal custody of Gray, when he was taken out of the van, and they not Goodson have responsibility for Gray’s death.

    Goodson's attorneys argue that the Maryland Court of Appeals allows the admission of a prosecutor's closing argument in another trial, to be admitted as evidence, if it helps the defense.

    Goodson faces seven different charges in the death of Freddie Gray, including second degree murder, depraved heart.

  11. #71
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    Closing Arguments Expected Today In Goodson Trial
    June 20, 2016

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    12:01 a.m.

    Closing arguments are expected this morning at the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police van driver Officer Caesar Goodson.

    Goodson is charged with the death in April of last year for Freddie Gray.

    Judge Barry Williams hasn’t given lawyers any time limits for their closing arguments, but since this is a bench trial, like Officer Edward Nero’s trial last month, expect Judge Williams to interrupt lawyers with questions on their arguments.

    The questions might offer a clue as to how the judge might rule on this case.

    In the Nero trial, Williams spent more time questioning prosecutors and later found Nero not guilty on all for charges.

    Last week, when he dismissed a defense motion to dismiss the charges, the judge said it was a close call on the most serious charge, second degree murder, depraved heart.

    Goodson also faces six other charges.

    The judge will also rule on a defense motion to admit part of prosecutor Michael Schatzow’s closing argument in Nero’s trial to be admitted as evidence in Goodson's trial.

    In that statement, Schatzow told the judge that other officers were responsible for Freddie Gray’s safety when he was taken out of the van. That appears to contradict the prosecution's argument in this case that Goodson, and no other officer, had custody of Gray, and was therefore responsible for his injuries and death..

    If the Nero trial is any indication, the judge will not hand down a verdict today, but will wait until tomorrow or Wednesday to hand down a verdict.

    The judge will announce when he will do that before court adjourns for the day.

    Court resumes this morning at 10

  12. #72
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    Closing Arguments Conclude In Goodson Trial; Verdict To Be Issued Thursday
    Monday, June 20, 2016

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    12:31 p.m.

    Proceedings have concluded. Judge Barry Williams said he will deliver his verdict Thursday at 10 a.m.

    In closing arguments, the two sides disagreed on what happened at the police van's fourth stop. That's when Officer William Porter told Goodson that Gray would not be able to pass a medical check at Central Booking, that Gray should be taken to a hospital, and Goodson agreed, according to testimony by Porter.

    In a 40-minute rebuttal frequently interrupted by questions from Williams, prosecutor Michael Schatzow said Gray's death was "not a result of a card game; it's homicide caused by inaction of an officer."

    Williams asked if, based on Goodson's apparent lack of training, if failing to take Gray to the hospital rises to the level of criminal negligence. Yes, Schatzow said.

    "What if Gray said he needed to go to hospital and there was nothing wrong with him, did Goodson still have duty to take him?" Williams asked.

    Schatzow said that he did have that duty.

    11:41 a.m.

    Prosecutor Janice Bledsoe said Officer Caesar Goodson "breached" his duty, while defense attorneys accused the prosecution of shifting their theories on what led to Freddie Gray's death.

    Defense attorney Matt Fraling said Gray put himself in a position where he would be prone to injury. Judge Barry Williams questioned Fraling on Gray's supposed combativeness.

    Bledsoe said Goodson missed four opportunities to get Gray medical attention, and five opportunities to ensure he was properly restrained in the van. Williams questioned Bledsoe on Gray's injuries.

    The state will get a rebuttal to the defense's closing argument.

    9:45 a.m.

    Among those arriving at Courthouse East for closing arguments in the second degree murder trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, is another accused police officer, Edward Nero.

    Nero arrived at Courthouse East at around 9:30 this morning.

    Nero was acquitted of all charges at his own trial last month.

    He testified for the defense before they rested on Friday.

    It is not clear why Nero is in court today, since the defense rested.

    On Friday, Nero was on the stand for only 15 minutes.

    Nero at his own trial testified that he helped load Freddie Gray back into the van at its second stop, after police officers put leg shackles and flex cuffs on Gray.

    That stop was at Mount and Baker Streets, and police moved the van to this stop, to get away from a growing crowd that was forming at the site of Gray's arrest in the 1700-block of Pressbury Street.

    At the second stop, Nero described Gray as" uncooperative" and " passive aggressive."

    Nero also told defense attorney Matt Fraling that once the van door was closed he could not see Gray kicking, but he did see the van shaking and heard banging.

    Officer Goodson arrived at the courthouse at around 9:40 a.m.

    Court resumes at 10 a.m.
    Last edited by sunny47; 06-21-2016 at 01:54 AM.

  13. #73
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    Judge to Read Baltimore Officer Caesar Goodson’s Verdict on Thursday
    June 21, 2016

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    Judge Barry Williams will be announcing the verdict in the trial of Baltimore polie officer Caesar Goodsonm who is facing a second degree depraved heart murder charge in relation to the death of Freddie Gray.
    he verdict of Caesar Goodson, the Baltimore police officer facing the most serious charge in the death of Freddie Gray, is expected to be read by Judge Barry Williams on Thursday morning, two weeks after the trial began, CNN reports.

    Goodson, who elected to be tried by judge earlier this month and forego a jury trial, is facing multiple charges, including second-degree depraved heart murder, for his role as van driver. The incident that left Gray dead from a spinal injury after he was not secured properly in the back of the police van when he was apprehended by officers.

    Goodson also faces charges of misconduct in office, involuntary manslaughter, manslaughter by vehicles (gross negligence), manslaughter by vehicle (criminal negligence) and reckless endangerment.


    According to CNN, during closing arguments on Monday, prosecutors insisted that Goodson failed to properly secure Gray in the back of the van and then, failed to provide the young man with proper care once Gray said that he needed medical attention.

    Prosecutors also claimed that Gray was subject to a “rough ride,” which was described as punishment officers used against unruly suspects.

    “His actions constitute, and his omissions constitute, depraved heart murder,” Deputy State’s Attorney Janice Bledsoe said, according to CNN.

  14. #74
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    Authorities prepare for Caesar Goodson verdict reaction

    Protests possible after verdict announced Thursday

    UPDATED 4:34 PM EDT Jun 21, 2016

    BALTIMORE —The 11 News I-Team has learned everyone from the Maryland National Guard to city and suburban police departments are prepared to respond to potential unrest on Thursday when [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].

    A small, boisterous group of demonstrators urged people to show up for a larger protest Thursday at Courthouse East.
    "People have to be here to respond to it if this killer cop walks or gets off with a slap on the wrist," said Carl Dix, with the Revolutionary Communist Party.

    The protesters handed out flyers and their minds, apparently, are already made up. The flyer says when the verdict is reached, show your outrage; take to the streets. But the tone of the message is not universally accepted.

    "As NAACP, we protest things when it is necessary, but in this case, I don't want to see anyone get locked up and I don't want to see any harm come to any person or to any property in Baltimore City. We have seen enough," said Tessa Hill Aston, with the NAACP.

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    Hoping people remain calm and respectful no matter what the verdict is!
    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

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    Judge to deliver verdict for police officer charged with murder in Freddie Gray case

    By [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] June 23 at 7:00 AM

    BALTIMORE — A judge is set to render a verdict Thursday morning for the sole officer charged with murder in the case of Freddie Gray, whose death in police custody last year set off protests and riots throughout the city.

    Judge Barry G. Williams is expected to announce his decision at 10 a.m. in the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson Jr., who faces counts of second-degree depraved-heart murder, manslaughter, and other charges.

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    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

  16. #76
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    WATCH WJZ THURSDAY: [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] | [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

  17. #77
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    Tick Tock
    hoping the judge does the right thing today!

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    Administrator Aubrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juliekan View Post
    Tick Tock
    hoping the judge does the right thing today!
    Me too Julie, hoping if Judge Williams returns with a not guilty verdict, folks will accept it and remain calm.
    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

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    Verdict To Be Announced Today At Goodson Trial
    Thursday, June 23, 2016

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    9:30 a.m.

    Officer Caesar Goodson has arrived at Courthouse East for the verdict in his seocnd degree manslaughter trial.

    As he has throughout the trial, Goodson arrived in the Lexington Street entrance to the courthouse surrounded by sheriff's deputies.

    As of 9 a.m. there were just three protesters outside of Courthouse East. One of them was Arthur Johnson who is the only protester to have stood outside the courthouse through the trials.

    Portable metal barricades surround the courthouse.

    Court is expected to convene at 10 a.m.

    A transcript of Judge Barry Williams' decision is expected to be posted on the courthouse website this afternoon.

    12:01 a.m.

    Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams is expected to hand down the verdict today in the second degree murder trial of Baltimore City Police Officer Caesar Goodson, who is charged in the death of Freddie Gray, in April of last year.

    Goodson, 46, was driving the van that transported Gray on the day of his arrest.

    After hearing testimony over eight days, Judge Williams will announce his verdict after 10 a.m.

    As he did with the trial of Officer Edward Nero last month, the judge is expected to announcing the legal reasoning behind his decision on seven different charges.

    The court proceedings are expected to take around 20-30 minutes.

    Prosecutors have argued that Goodson failed to follow police department policy and put a seat belt on Gray when he was loaded into the van, and failed to get him medical attention, as the van stopped during a "rough ride."

    Prosecutors note those failures contributed to Gray's injuries and death. They argue Goodson had legal responsibility for Gray's safety.

    Defense attorneys argued Gray's injuries were an accident, and in his closing argument Monday, defense attorney Matthew Fraling argued that Gray moved off the van floor, where he was placed, and that caused his injuries.

    Prosecutors presented 22 witnesses over five days, and the defense presented nine witnesses over three days.

    Many legal experts believe it is not possible for Goodson to be convicted on all seven charges, because Goodson faces several charges that are considered alternatives to the most serious charge, second degree murder depraved heart.

    Goodson is also charged with involuntary manslaughter, second degree assault, manslaughter by auto or boat, criminally negligent manslaughter by vehicle, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment.

    If convicted of seocnd degree murder depraved heart, Goodson could face 30 years in prison.

    Last Thursday, after the prosecution rested, Judge Williams declined a defense request to dismiss all charges, though he said it was a "close call" for the second degree murder charge.

    Many of the lawyers and law professors who have sat in the courtroom for this trial believe that is a signal the judge will acquit Goodson on the second degree murder charge.

    "The issue that the Court will have to wrestle with is whether or not Goodson's failure to seek medical attention, and his failure to buckle, if the judge can infer that Officer Goodson was aware of the risks he was placing Mr. Gray in, then there will be a conviction," said University of Baltimore Law Professor David Jaros.

    Many attorneys who watch the case believe if Goodson is convicted of anything, there will be a certain appeal based on the fact that Judge Williams admonished prosecutors both before and during the trial for failing to turn over evidence that would clear Goodson.

    Before the trial began last week, defense attorneys had asked the judge to dismiss this case because prosecutors withheld evidence of a police interview with the assistant medical examiner who performed Gray's autopsy, in which she said Gray's death could have been caused by a "freakish accident."

    That medical examiner, Dr. Carol Allan, later testified for the state that Gray's manner of death was homicide and she had not considered the alternative it was an accidental.

    At the time the judge said dismissing the case was "draconian," but the judge admonished prosecutors.

    As was the case when the verdict was announced before the verdict in Nero's trial was announced, security will be tight in and around Courthouse East.

    Portable metal fences are expected to be placed around the courthouse and all leave for police officers and sheriff's deputies has been cancelled.

    On the C-4 Show on Wednesday, Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said the city is prepared to address any protesters or unrest.

    He said the city has memorandum of understanding with major jurisdictions nearby, but that he doesn't expect to make use of them.

    "We're going to be at our best no matter what. No matter what the verdict tomorrow, our community is prepared to move forward," Davis said. "We're prepared because the community demands us to be prepared."

    He said if he sees peaceful protests outside his office window overlooking City Hall, that's fine by him.

    There was a small protest outside the courthouse after the Nero verdict was announced. Nero was acquitted on all charges.

    In December, there was a larger protest outside of the courthouse after the trial of Officer William Porter ended with a hung jury.

    Leaders of a group including members of the Revolutionary Communist Party, and the Mass Incarceration are calling for a larger protest today.

    Most days during the trial there was only one protester outside of the courthouse.

    Goodson is the only one of the six officers accused in Gray's death who did not sue Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby or Baltimore City Sheriff's Major Sam Cogen, who conducted the investigation on behalf of the state's attorney's office.

    The Baltimore Sun reports that in an affidavit unsealed on Wednesday, Cogen said he played no role in the investigation.

    Cogen did admit to signing documents presented by prosecutors, and then executed arrest warrants.

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    It's happening now. Reporters have gone silent, court is in session. [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    #‎GoodsonTrial‬ - No cameras or tweeting allowed in court. We won't hear verdict until reporters come out. [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]





    #‎GoodsonTrial‬
    - Contrary to reports, the verdict will not be streamed LIVE. It's LIVE coverage outside the courthouse.


    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]








    Last edited by Aubrey; 06-23-2016 at 03:35 PM.
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    Not guilty


    all counts!!!

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    Freddie Gray case: Officer Caesar Goodson found not guilty on all charges
    June 23, 2016

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    The Baltimore Police officer van driver accused of giving a “rough ride” that killed Freddie Gray was found not guilty by Judge Barry Williams of the most serious charges he faced, second-degree murder.

    The Baltimore Police officer van driver accused of giving a “rough ride” that killed Freddie Gray was found not guilty by Judge Barry Williams of the most serious charges he faced, second-degree murder.


    Officer Caesar Goodson Jr., 46, had faced the most serious charges of any of the six officers indicted in Gray’s death last April, including a charge of second-degree murder. Goodson was also charged with three counts of manslaughter, second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office.

    Prosecutors argued Goodson had five chances to render aid to Gray after his neck was broken in the back of the van, which they said demonstrated a “depraved heart.”




    They also said Goodson was the direct cause of the injuries, driving the van in a reckless manner that threw the shackled black man around in the back of the van’s steel cage. As a certified field training officer, prosecutors said Goodson knew Police Department rules and broke them.

    Goodson’s defense attorneys said officers who checked on Gray didn’t know he was seriously injured, and that Goodson deferred to decisions of other officers not to put a seatbelt on Gray.

    They disputed the time frame of Gray’s injuries, placing them later in the van’s journey and therefore offering less chances to intervene, and blamed Gray himself, saying he had been placed on his stomach in the van and stood up.

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    Officer Found Not Guilty of Second-Degree Murder in Freddie Gray Trial

    • By Serena Marshall - MORGAN WINSOR

      Jun 23, 2016, 10:49 AM ET

      Officer Caesar Goodson Jr., the third of six Baltimore City police officers to stand trial for their alleged role in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray, was found not guilty of second-degree murder today by Judge Barry Williams.

      [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

      Good, Judge Williams, imo made the right decision!
    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

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    Officer Caesar Goodson acquitted of all counts

    Judge Barry Williams hands down verdict Thursday morning

    11:18 AM EDT Jun 23, 2016

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    Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams announced his verdict Thursday morning on the following seven counts:

    Second-degree murder, depraved heart: NOT GUILTY
    Manslaughter: NOT GUILTY
    Second-degree assault: NOT GUILTY
    Vehicular manslaughter (two counts): NOT GUILTY
    Reckless endangerment: NOT GUILTY
    Misconduct in office: NOT GUILTY


    Williams said the state failed to prove evidence of a rough ride, that Goodson failed to get medical attention and and that he failed to seat belt Gray. Williams said the state failed to prove on each charge that Goodson intentionally harmed Gray.

    Williams said Goodson didn't show any animosity toward Gray or even claimed to know him.

    The eight-day trial concluded with closing arguments Monday in front of a courtroom full of people, including Officer Edward Nero and Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby.

    The state called a total of 22 witnesses, while the defense presented a truncated case, calling only nine witnesses during the trial. Nero was the surprise and final witness called on Friday by the defense testifying on behalf of Goodson, who chose not to testify.

    The state presented a "rough ride" theory which was eventually debunked by testimony from their own police expert witness and was further criticized during the defense's closing statements as a game of three-card Monte played by prosecutors in terms of their theories.

  26. #86
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    Jun 23 2016, 5:00 pm ET

    Trial of Van Driver in Freddie Gray Case Reveals Prosecutor Violations

    by Safia Samee Ali

    The high stakes and ultimately failed legal gambit by the Baltimore City State's Attorney's office to convict Officer Caesar Goodson, in the death of 25-year old Freddie Gray, brought to light a murkier side of what went on behind the scenes.

    According to presiding Judge Barry Williams, prosecutors in the Goodson trial withheld critical information from the defense that could have helped their case. Sharing such "exculpatory" information is a core legal obligation in prosecutions and goes to fundamental fairness rights.

    "I'm not saying you did anything nefarious. I'm saying you don't understand what 'exculpatory' means," Williams told prosecutors upon discovering the violations.

    SNIP

    Such prosecutor violations are also not unique to the Freddie Gray trials. It happens a lot.

    The Innocence Project, a non-profit legal organization that works against wrongful convictions, [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] prosecutorial misconduct in five states over the past five years and found that the practice was widespread.

    "There were several prosecutors' offices that did not hand over evidence that they should have," said Paul Cates, communications director for the Innocence Project. "We know the system that is supposed to prevent this is inadequate due to very little transparency and very little accountability."

    In preparing for the Goodson trial, which received a significant degree of national attention, Baltimore prosecutors had a meeting with Donta Allen, the other arrestee in the back of the wagon with Freddie Gray.

    Although, they had Allen's police statement from the day Gray sustained his injuries, prosecutors decided to speak to him once more in the presence of his attorney.

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    They made no mention of this to Goodson's defense attorneys.

    The fact that the meeting took place found its way to the defense over a year later by way of Allen's attorney, Jack Rubin. Defense attorneys said Rubin came to them as a "conscientious lawyer who felt a duty bound to alert the court and the defense to the state's misconduct."

    A livid Judge Williams skewered prosecutors on this failure before opening statements kicked off. "Isn't that your duty to turn things over, my concern is what else is out there that you didn't turn over?" he asked prosecutor Michael Schatzow.

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    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

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    Officer Goodson, van driver acquitted in Freddie Gray's death, to receive $87K in back pay

    July 11, 2016

    fficer Caesar Goodson Jr., who was acquitted of second-degree murder and other charges in the death of Freddie Gray, is set to receive $87,000 in back pay.

    The city's Board of Estimates is set to authorize a payment of $87,705 to Goodson on Wednesday. Goodson and three other officers charged with felonies in connection with Gray's death were suspended without pay, under department policy. Having been acquitted, Goodson is now entitled to back pay under that policy.

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    Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies... By Andy Dufresne/Shawshank Redemption

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