Upcoming Events for the Next 7 Day(s)

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Administrator sunny47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    3,936
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    State of emergency declared amid violence at Charlottesville's 'Unite the Right' rall

    State of emergency declared amid violence at Charlottesville's 'Unite the Right' rally
    August 12, 2017

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe has declared a state of emergency "to aid state response to violence" ahead of Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, according to a post on his Twitter account.

    The city of Charlottesville has declared Saturday's gathering at Emancipation Park -- site of the scheduled "Unite the Right" rally" of white nationalists and right-wing protesters -- an unlawful assembly. Police officers are speaking on bullhorns, directing people to leave the park.
    CNN video shows police in riot gear standing shoulder to shoulder behind their shields. Some people appear to be leaving the park.
    City officials also declared a local emergency, which will allow officials to request additional resources, if needed, to respond.

    Demonstrators clashed Saturday on the streets of Charlottesville ahead of a "Unite the Right" rally as white nationalists and other right-wing groups -- and counter-protesters -- converged in this college town in the latest flare-up of a running nation debate over the country's identity.
    Fist fights and screaming matches erupted before the rally, which police expect to attract thousands of people. The skirmishes unfolded just hours after a scuffle Friday night between torch-bearing demonstrators and counter-protesters at the nearby University of Virginia.
    Saturday's rally is the latest event drawing white nationalists and right-wing activists from across the country to this Democratic-voting college town -- a development first precipitated by the city's decision to remove symbols of its Confederate past.

    Demonstrators clashed Saturday on the streets of Charlottesville ahead of a "Unite the Right" rally as white nationalists and other right-wing groups -- and counter-protesters -- converged in this college town in the latest flare-up of a running nation debate over the country's identity.
    Fist fights and screaming matches erupted before the rally, which police expect to attract thousands of people. The skirmishes unfolded just hours after a scuffle Friday night between torch-bearing demonstrators and counter-protesters at the nearby University of Virginia.
    Saturday's rally is the latest event drawing white nationalists and right-wing activists from across the country to this Democratic-voting college town -- a development first precipitated by the city's decision to remove symbols of its Confederate past.

  2. #2
    Administrator sunny47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    3,936
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Woman killed Charlottesville crash identified
    August 13, 2017




    The 32-year old woman killed in Charlottesville on Saturday has been identified as Heather Heyer, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said Sunday.
    Heyer was killed after a car rammed into a crowd of demonstrators protesting against white supremacists.

    One person died when a car plowed into a crowd following a dispersed gathering of white nationalists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville.
    Shortly before the attack Saturday, fistfights and screaming matches erupted between counterprotesters and white nationalists protesting the removal of a confederate monument. The clashes led to the cancellation of scheduled protests, sending demonstrators from both sides marching on nearby streets. A few hours later, a car slammed into a throng of counterprotesters

    The victims
    A 32-year-old woman was killed in the car-ramming incident, Charlottesville Police Chief Al Thomas said.
    A total of 19 others were also hurt, including five people still in critical condition Sunday, a spokeswoman for the University of Virginia Medical Center said.


    Trooper Berke M.M. Bates (left) and Lt. H. Jay Cullen (right)
    Two Virginia State Patrol troopers died when a helicopter crashed in a wooded area near Charlottesville after monitoring Saturday's events. The pilot, Lt. H. Jay Cullen, 48, and Trooper Berke M.M. Bates, who would have turned 41 on Sunday, were killed. Authorities are investigating the cause of the crash.
    City officials say at least 15 others were wounded in events associated with the scheduled rally.

  3. #3
    Administrator mykittysmama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    7,658
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    James Alex Fields had court this morning.


    Dean Seal‏ @JDeanSeal 2h2 hours ago

    Head down, J. A. Fields said he cannot afford a lawyer and has no tie to the #Charlottesville area.


    Verbal scuffle breaking outside #Charlottesville court where JA Fields had his first appearance for second degree murder charge.


    One man, who won't say his name, saying the city is to blame for violence, promises Alt-R will return to #Charlottesville. Escorted out now


    Interesting tid bit, the #Charlottesville Public Defenders unable to defend JA Fields bc they are in some way connected to the fatal crash.


    Judge assigned Charles "Buddy" Weber to JA Fields' case. In 2013, Weber ran for #Charlottesville City Council on Republican ticket.


    Charlottesville suspect James Alex Fields Jr. denied bail in first court appearance
    “Until one has loved an animal, a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” ~ Anatole France

  4. #4
    Administrator mykittysmama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    7,658
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Charlottesville suspect accused of beating his disabled mother, threatening her with knife, 911 calls show

    Aug 14, 2017


    James Alex Fields Jr., the driver charged with killing a woman at the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, was previously accused of beating his mother and threatening her with a 12-inch knife, according to transcripts from dramatic 911 calls released Monday.

    Samantha Bloom, who is disabled and uses a wheelchair, repeatedly called police about her son, in 2010 and 2011, telling officers he was on medication to control his temper, transcripts from 911 calls show.

    Records show that Fields was arrested and put in juvenile detention after his mother reported in 2011 that he stood behind her wielding a knife. Earlier in the year, she called 911 to say that her son was “being very threatening toward her” and that she didn't feel “in control on the situation,” according to a dispatcher’s notes obtained by The Washington Post.

    In another incident in 2010, the mom said her son smacked her in the head and locked her in the bathroom after she told him to stop playing video games.

    There was no indication in the records that he was arrested. Nine calls from the home to law enforcement have been logged since 2010, the Toledo Blade added.

    Securitas Security Services confirmed it fired him from his job as a security officer after the Charlottesville crash. The company added that he was on "vacation" at the time, and performed his job "satisfactorily" while he was employed there.

    snipped

    Also Monday, a former classmate told The Associated Press that on a school trip to Europe in 2015, a teenage Fields couldn't stand the French and said he only went on the trip so that he could visit "the Fatherland" -- Germany.

    "He just really laid on about the French being lower than us and inferior to us," said Keegan McGrath.

    McGrath, now 18, said he challenged Fields on his beliefs, and the animosity between them grew so heated that it came to a boil at dinner on their second day. He said he went home after three or four days because he couldn't handle being in a room with Fields.

    The incident shocked McGrath because he had been in German class with Fields for two unremarkable years.

    "He was just a normal dude" most of the time, though he occasionally made "dark" jokes that put his class on edge, including one "offhand joke" about the Holocaust, McGrath said.


    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
    “Until one has loved an animal, a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” ~ Anatole France

  5. #5
    Administrator sunny47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    3,936
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Police Brace for More White Nationalist Rallies, but Have Few Options
    11 hrs ago
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]



    After events in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend showed how much violence white nationalist rallies could provoke, police chiefs from Richmond, Va., to Boston were taking steps to avoid a repeat of a situation in which the police appeared to have little control of the crowd.
    Texas A&M University canceled a “white lives matter” rally at which Richard Spencer, a white supremacist leader, was to appear, citing safety concerns. Officials in Mountain View, Calif., where Google has its headquarters, were gearing up for one of several marches at the company’s offices around the country to protest the firing of a male employee who wrote a memo criticized as sexist.
    Rallies like the one in Charlottesville, fueled by overt displays of racism, attended by members of self-described militias, and attracting counterprotesters, pose novel challenges: Many of the demonstrators are legally and openly carrying firearms, including semiautomatic weapons. And instead of protesters versus police, as has often been the case in recent years, the situation is civilian versus civilian, with some participants spoiling for a fight.
    But to deal with these new circumstances, the police have few new tactics.

    Crowd-control techniques are much the same, experts said, whether demonstrators are armed or not. A crucial technique is keeping opposing sides apart, which the police tried and failed to do in Charlottesville on Saturday. In the hours leading up to the planned rally, people fought in full view of police officers. On Monday, a man was charged with driving a car into a crowd of counterdemonstrators, killing a woman and injuring more than a dozen others. The actual rally was called off by the police after the governor declared a state of emergency.
    “Charlottesville turned into a riot,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh of Boston, where a free speech rally was thought to be planned for Saturday, although some of the details were murky. “Both sides were able to connect. In our city, we will do everything we can that those two sides never connect.”
    Mayor Walsh said that Boston wanted to discourage the rally’s organizers from coming, and that William B. Evans, the police commissioner, was developing a plan to keep the rally and any counterdemonstrations separate. By late Monday, it appeared that some of the billed speakers were backing out.


    Crowd-control techniques are much the same, experts said, whether demonstrators are armed or not. A crucial technique is keeping opposing sides apart, which the police tried and failed to do in Charlottesville on Saturday. In the hours leading up to the planned rally, people fought in full view of police officers. On Monday, a man was charged with driving a car into a crowd of counterdemonstrators, killing a woman and injuring more than a dozen others. The actual rally was called off by the police after the governor declared a state of emergency.
    “Charlottesville turned into a riot,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh of Boston, where a free speech rally was thought to be planned for Saturday, although some of the details were murky. “Both sides were able to connect. In our city, we will do everything we can that those two sides never connect.”
    Mayor Walsh said that Boston wanted to discourage the rally’s organizers from coming, and that William B. Evans, the police commissioner, was developing a plan to keep the rally and any counterdemonstrations separate. By late Monday, it appeared that some of the billed speakers were backing out.
    But if there is a rally, unlike the authorities in Charlottesville, officials in Boston will probably not be forced to confront a large number of armed protesters because Massachusetts allows only those with a gun license to openly carry a firearm. In Virginia, no license is required for those over 18.
    In South Carolina, where there were dozens of protests related to the removal of the Confederate battle flag from government buildings, firearms are prohibited from the State Capitol grounds. Leroy Smith, the state director of public safety, said that intense anger over such issues combined with the presence of firearms would have been a toxic mix.
    “With the added element of open carry, it creates more of a challenge for law enforcement officers because usually when you see a weapon and that person is not a law enforcement officer, you know you need to defuse the situation,” he said.
    Many urban police chiefs have opposed open-carry laws, even in states where people feel fiercely protective of their gun rights.
    John Eterno, a former training instructor with the New York Police Department who now teaches at Molloy College, said the presence of weapons combined with the unexpectedly large crowds in Charlottesville might have thrown off that city’s planning. When people have the right to carry firearms, the police must balance caution with respect, he said. Officers can do little more than check the person’s demeanor for signs of aggression and monitor whether the firearm is properly holstered.

    The Charlottesville police have faced a hailstorm of criticism from protesters and counterprotesters alike. Witnesses have said officers did little as violent confrontations unfolded in front of them.
    On Monday, officials defended their response, noting the lack of property damage in the city, and the Virginia governor said little could have been done to prevent a driver from hitting pedestrians.
    At a news conference on Monday afternoon, Al Thomas, the Charlottesville police chief, acknowledged that there were times when police officers were spread too thinly. “We had to actually send out forces to multiple locations to deal with a number of disturbances,” Chief Thomas said. He added: “It was certainly a challenge. We were spread thin once the groups dispersed.”

  6. #6
    Administrator sunny47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    3,936
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Jimmy Fallon Delivers Emotional Charlottesville Monologue: ‘I Was Sick to My Stomach’
    9 hours ago
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]


    Even though The Tonight Show isn’t a political show, it is my responsibility to stand up against intolerance and extremism as a human being.”
    That’s how Jimmy Fallon began his late-night monologue Monday night, addressing the horrifying, hateful events of this past weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia—which saw hundreds of neo-Nazis take to the streets to publicly flaunt their racist beliefs. One of these white supremacists allegedly took it upon himself to commit an ISIS-style terrorist attack, plowing his Dodge Challenger into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others. Two police officers also lost their lives when their helicopter crashed.

    And Fallon, who has understandably taken quite a bit of slack for ruffling Trump’s hair on The Tonight Show last September, thereby normalizing candidate Trump, has for the past several months been on the long path to redemption, calling out Trump for his glaring hypocrisies and, on this night, delivering the most poignant late-night speech on Charlottesville.
    “What happened over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, was just disgusting. I was watching the news like everyone else, and you’re seeing Nazi flags and torches and white supremacists, and I was sick to my stomach,” Fallon continued, tears welling in his eyes. “My daughters are in the next room playing and I’m thinking, ‘How can I explain to them that there’s so much hatred in this world?’ They’re two years old and four years old. They don’t know what hate is. They go to the playground and they have friends of all races and backgrounds, and they just play, and they laugh, and they have fun.”

    But as kids grow up, they need people to look up to—to show them what’s right, and good. They need parents and teachers, and they need leaders who appeal to the best in us. The fact that it took the president two days to come out and clearly denounce racists and white supremacists is shameful. And I think he finally spoke out because people everywhere stood up and said something. It’s important for everyone—especially white people—in this country to speak out against this. Ignoring it is just as bad as supporting it.”*
    “And remember: there are people who have given their lives to make sure this kind of hate doesn’t spread. They’ve fought and died on the right side of history. One brave woman in Charlottesville, Heather Heyer, died standing up for what’s right at the age of 32. I can’t look at my beautiful, growing, curious daughters and say nothing when this kind of thing is happening. We all need to stand against what is wrong, acknowledge that racism exists, and stand up for all that is right, and civil, and kind. And to show the next generation that we haven’t forgot how hard people have fought for human rights. We cannot do this. We can’t go back. We can’t go back.”

  7. #7
    Administrator sunny47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    3,936
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Seth Meyers Attacks Trump on Charlottesville: “He Is Not a President”
    “You can stand for a nation, or you can stand for a hateful movement. You can’t do both. And if you don’t make the right choice, I am confident that the American voter will.”
    August 14, 2017

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]


    On Monday night, late-night comedians took a moment to offer earnest responses to the tragedies that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. Like John Oliver, who responded to the “Unite the Right” rally and the act of terror that came with it on Sunday night, all of them—including Seth Meyers, Jimmy Fallon, Stephen Colbert, James Corden, and Jimmy Kimmel—were unimpressed, to put it mildly, with Donald Trump’s initial response, which criticized “violence on many sides.”
    “On many sides,” Meyers echoed in disbelief on Late Night. “If that choice of words made you feel sick to your stomach, the good news is you’re a normal and decent person. The jury is still out on the president, as he initially refused to condemn the white supremacist in this country. Now, he did read a statement at the White House today that finally struck the right tone, but I’m sorry, pencils-down on this subject was Saturday evening. He only gets very partial credit.”
    From there, Meyers took a moment to review Trump’s sordid history on race, starting with his ceaseless promotion of the birther movement: “Some ignored it or played it down when Donald Trump claimed our first black president wasn’t born in this country,” Meyers said. “It was racist and insane, but he was written off as a clown—a bitter little man who didn’t know an American could have a name like ’Barack Obama.’ And then he called Mexicans rapists during the speech announcing his candidacy; he called Elizabeth Warren Pocahontas. Then he brought Steve Bannon into the White House with him, worked to take away voting rights from black people, and hammered away at the idea that Chicago was a wasteland because of the violent black people living there. And now white supremacists and American Nazis are visible, and energetic, and demonstrative in a way that we have not seen in our lifetimes.”
    As for the president’s apparent reluctance to take responsibility for the violent, hateful contingent of voters he has emboldened? “Donald Trump did not immediately denounce the white supremacist movement when given the chance, and now, whether he knows it or not, many of those people see him as leading that movement,” Meyers continued. “The leader of our country is called a ‘president’ because he’s supposed to preside over our society. His job is to lead, to cajole, to scold, to correct our path, to lift up what is good about us and to absolutely and unequivocally and immediately condemn what is evil in us. And if he does not do that—if he does not preside over our society—then he is not a president. You can stand for a nation, or you can stand for a hateful movement. You can’t do both. And if you don’t make the right choice, I am confident that the American voter will.”

    Meyers’s network neighbor, Jimmy Fallon, offered a similarly sober take on The Tonight Show, noting that when he saw the news, his daughters—ages two and four—were playing in the next room. “As kids grow up, they need people to look up to,” an audibly emotional Fallon said. “To show them what’s right and good.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •