Baltimore police commissioner requests FBI take over investigation into detective's killing
2 hrs ago

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Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis has asked the FBI to take over the investigation into the death of Detective Sean Suiter.

Davis made the request in a formal letter submitted Friday to Federal Bureau of Investigations Director Christopher Wray. An FBI spokesman said the agency is aware of the request, but otherwise declined to comment.
Davis announced his decision at a news conference Friday, saying that a connection between Suiter's case and a sweeping, ongoing police corruption case — in which Suiter was scheduled to testify as a federal witness the day after he was shot — had diminished his faith that his own detectives could handle the death investigation while in the dark about the corruption investigation.
"Our homicide detectives, some of the best in the business, some of the best I've ever seen, can't do their jobs effectively if there is a perception or a reality that we don't possess all the information that we need to conduct the investigation," Davis said.
He also acknowledged that handing over the investigation could ease public concerns about whether it would be objective.
"The community needs to know that I am willing, and this police department is willing, to invite any extra sets of eyes or resources, whether it's investigative or prosecutorial, to look at this incident to try to figure it out," he said.
Davis said he discussed his decision with Suiter's widow, Nicole, and his family, and that they seemed to understand it.
Suiter, a homicide detective, was fatally shot in the head Nov. 15 amid what police have described repeatedly in recent weeks as a violent struggle with an unknown suspect on a troubled block in West Baltimore

Davis said Friday that investigators also have looked into the possibility Suiter committed suicide, but have found no evidence supporting that theory and don't believe it is probable.

However, one source familiar with the investigation told The Baltimore Sun that inside the Police Department, officials are divided about where the evidence points. While some share the commissioner's view that the case appears to be a homicide, some lean toward suicide as the most likely explanation, the source said.

Davis said Friday that investigators also have looked into the possibility Suiter committed suicide, but have found no evidence supporting that theory and don't believe it is probable.

However, one source familiar with the investigation told The Baltimore Sun that inside the Police Department, officials are divided about where the evidence points. While some share the commissioner's view that the case appears to be a homicide, some lean toward suicide as the most likely explanation, the source said.